Tag Archives: deaf blind

“It’s too dark”

Time changes everything, sometimes more quickly than we’d like.  When you know what’s coming, you should be prepared for it, right?  The time table we were given just doesn’t make sense, it wasn’t accurate.  In the beginning, when we were absorbing information as fast as we possibly could, we held onto every word that every […]

An Energizing Meeting

  On Tuesday the 31st I made a trip up to the Perkins school for the blind in Watertown to meet with a couple of the staff there and show them the BecDot, a braille educational toy I am developing to help provide access to blind and visually impaired people ( more on the device […]

The BecDot

This a project I am working on called the BecDot which is a literacy teaching tool I invented for our daughter Rebecca that could be used to teach visually impaired children Braille concepts..  This video talks a bit about our mission. Learn more about Usher syndrome and get involved We are telling the world about […]

Feeling Like We Don’t Belong

I took Rebecca to story time this morning as I usually do on Thursdays.  We walked in and sat on the floor with the rest of the moms/grandmothers and their toddlers.  A few minutes into story time Rebecca was curious and got up to go look at something at the back of the room.  A […]

Now Approaching Boston

This past weekend I spent a good portion of the day at a visions seminar hosted by the Foundation Fighting Blindness.  It was not until I received a text from Beth that I realized that exactly one year prior was when we found out that Rebecca would eventually go blind.  Before that day I would not […]

Reading From the Same Book

Beth and I have been reading a book titled, “No Barriers” authored by Erik Weihenmayer.  Erik is an adventurer who is telling his story about kayaking the Grand Canyon and also discusses his adventures of hiking Mt. Everest.  He is also vice president of the board of the not for profit, No barriers USA, which began […]

All Things are Difficult Before They Become Easy

My experience as a parent of a disabled child.